Adaptation – Speed and Strength

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My previous post on adaptation as about getting the technical moving parts going in the right directions.  Now we have to consider the nervous system for speed and the muscular system for strength.

Einstein is quoted as saying “Make everything as simple as possible, but no simpler.”

I have a friend who trolls the ‘net’ for advanced techniques and wants to know how to train for a ‘new’ energy system.  I had years of that at Uni on glycolitic pathways and Crebb’s cycles and such, but when you get on the track without the full laboratory of testing equipment it doesn’t mean a thing. Let’s hear it for common sense.

Muscles are for strength.  The nervous system is for speed.  Do not mix them up.

By that I mean don’t try to improve your speed with weights and don’t try to improve your strength with speed.

strength in the gym, speed on the track.  How else can I say it????

Strength – absolutely.  Thirty minutes in the gym three days a week.  Warm up on the rower, 3 to 4 mins.

Dead lift, Bench Press, Oblique pulleys, Chins.  Find your 3 rep max for the first two (DL & BP) and when that gets easy add 10kg and go back to 2 or 3 reps.  For the other two build up to 10 reps then add weight (not reps).

This type of ‘lifting ‘ will strengthen muscles, tendons and ligaments in proportion and prevent injuries.

Speed – absolutely.  I am a short to long fan.  When you can run 10m flat out increase to 20m etc.  Have a long recovery between reps so you have a fresh nervous system each run.  Do a lot of agility drills as well to keep joints, ligaments and tendons up to the challenge.

Finally on adaptation;  don’t tell the academics this, but periodisation is crap.  Building your systems (flexibility, strength, speed and endurance) on a daily and weekly basis is a natural way for the body to improve proportionally.

If you train at 80% continually and ramp up three weeks before a major event you will be in a high state of fitness without ‘burning out’ or having overload injuries.

Remembering Wolffe’s Law, “The body will adapt to any reasonable challenge.” (my translation).

Attitude Gets It Every Time

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How hard is it to train your heart out only to be let down by nerves at the point of competition?

For years I have taught athletes to be in control of their emotions, and I have , of course, used it to great advantage myself.

I never was a ‘gifted’ athlete and failed miserably at school sports.  I took up coaching when there was no one else to do the job  Then left it until I discovered Neuro Linguistic Programming and was approached by an athlete to take over her training.  So, yes, I thought I could use NLP to advantage as a coach.

That worked well until EFT, Emotional Freedom Technique, came along and realy made a difference.  I introduced it to some of my athletes but only a few would acknowledge it’s value.  Probably because it’s ‘new age’ stuff and secondly our tough as nails athletes would not admit to having a need for ‘nerve cure’.

EFT has made some wonderful differences to some lives I have touched, including mine, and I first used it for myself in the sporting context at my first national comp five years ago.  The result was unimpressive for me as it took three days for my emotions to agree that I had won my first two Gold medals.  No elation when crossing the line, just ‘Ho hum, I’ve come first’.

So having left EFT almost dormant, except for myself, I was pleasantly surprised to find Dr Silvia Hartmann has taken it to a new level, way past ‘ho hum’ to ‘what absolute joy’.  Impressed enough to enter her Master Certification Course and re-enter the Proffesional EFT field.

This is about Emotional Body Energy.  When it flows, you feel great.  When it doesn’t you feel crap.  This is how to make it work for you.